Rockwell Kent, This is My Own - New York State Museum.
PSU Home > Museum Home > Rockwell Kent > This is My Own > Of Men and Mountains
Back Previous SectionOf Men and MountainsNext Section Next
Kent playing his fatherís flute, which he carried on all his travels, Asgaard, c.1950
Kent playing his fatherís flute, which he carried
on all his travels, Asgaard, c.1950

    In 1947 Kentís mother died at the age of 91, leaving each of her children $30,000. Kent invested most of his inheritance in hopes of building a hedge against his plummeting income.

    With the rest, the artist returned with his wife, Sally, to Monhegan Island, Maine, the scene of his earliest triumphs and transgressions.

    He reacquired the little cottage he had built back in 1907. By visiting in the fall and early spring, when the tourists were gone, Monhegan seemed little changed:

ďMy body has grown old. I walk now where I used to run; step carefully where once Iíd leap. But still, my eyes are good. And seeing, must I not respond to natureís beauty? I began to paint again, with undiminished love for the familiar scenes.Ē

ďI lug my canvasses across the gullies, up the headlands. I relive my youth. Or better I am young again.Ē


    But fallout from Kentís clash with U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy was immediate. Kentís politics were never a secret to the islanders, but now the symptoms were instantly apparent: avoidance on the footpaths, hurried departures from the general store whenever the Kents came in. Unable to find sanctuary even on Monhegan, Kent and Sally soon left, never to return.

    The Adirondack Mountains that cradle Asgaard still inspired the aging artist, but his paintings were accumulating in his studio, most unseen by anyone except Sally.

    In 1960 Kent arranged to give eighty canvases and eight hundred drawings and prints, work that covered every phase of his career, to the Soviet Union, ďthe one people in the world who have demonstrated their high regard for what I do.Ē
Kent gave Asgaard Dairy to two loyal farmhands (left) after Kentís political views created a regional boycott, 1948
Kent gave Asgaard Dairy to two loyal farmhands (left)
after Kentís political views created a regional boycott, 1948
Back Previous SectionOf Men and MountainsNext Section Next



Thumbnail ImageOnce Upon a Time, 1956-59
oil on canvas
Bequest of Sally Kent Gorton
[P52000.180]
Thumbnail ImageMemorial Day, Monhegan, 1950
oil on canvas
Gift of Sally Kent Gorton
[X1978.1.11]
Thumbnail ImageGull Rock, Monhegan, c.1950's
oil on board
Bequest of Sally Kent Gorton
[P52000.182]
Thumbnail ImageBlackhead, Monhegan, 1950
oil on canvas
Gift of Sally Kent Gorton
[X1978.1.4]
Thumbnail ImageAu Sable River Rapids, 1950
oil on canvas
Gift of Sally Kent Gorton
[X1978.1.15]
Thumbnail ImageWinter Sunrise or Winter Sunrise, Adirondacks, 1952
oil on wood
Bequest of Sally Kent Gorton
[P52000.181]
Thumbnail ImageAsgaard Jerseys, 1965
oil on canvas
Gift of Sally Kent Gorton
[X1978.1.13]
About  Early Years  New Hampshire  Monhegan  Newfoundland  Alaska  Hogarth Jr.   Vermont   Tierra del Fuego   Ireland   Au Sable Farm
Book Illustrations   Bookplates   Greenland   Printmaking   Murals   Political Art   Commercial Work   Of Men and Mountains   The Kent Legacy
Top of Page

PSU Logo
Plattsburgh State University, Home Page

Copyright © 2009, The Plattsburgh State Art Museum.
All rights reserved. Copyright Statement
101 Broad Street, Plattsburgh, NY 12901
Phone: (518) 564-2474

Send comments to: Plattsburgh State Art Museum
Last Updated: 2/3/2009